Tag: affection

By Leah Bayens

March Featured Essay

Editor’s note: this is part two of Leah’s two-part series on the Berry Farming and Ecological Agrarianism Program at St. Catharine College in Kentucky. Part one, “A Way of Thought Based on Land,” introduced readers to Wendell Berry’s vision and an affection-based curriculum. PBS has also recently featured Wendell Berry and the program; watch the PBS video here.

I am aware of the potential damage of institutionalizing “land affection”—or institutionalizing anything, for that matter. Berry, after all, has long censured the “fierce and protective orthodoxy” of scientific, agricultural, political, economic, and religious institutions that reinforce the status quo. He writes that our “history forbids us to be surprised that an orthodoxy of thought should become narrow, rigid, mercenary, morally corrupt, and vengeful against dissenters.” So why would we be interested in institutionalizing agrarian thought within a college run by Catholic sisters?

Read More Institutionalizing Affection

Leah Bayens

By Tara M. Tuttle

Response to “Institutionalizing Agrarian Thought” by Leah Bayens

Doing activist work in an institution is tricky. Institutional practices can suppress activism in a variety of ways including discouraging dissent, depleting resources of time and energy, and distancing activists from the individuals directly affected by the very injustices they are trying to prevent. On the other hand, institutions sometimes support activism through providing funding, disseminating information, coordinating volunteer or paid labor, or hosting space for public dialogue. Social justice educators and activists working in institutions must navigate this confusing and often contradictory landscape.

 

Read More Flint and the Need for Institutional Affection

Responses

Institutionalizing Agrarian Thought

By Leah Bayens

February Featured Essay

Editor’s note: this is part one of Leah’s two-part series on the Berry Farming and Ecological Agrarianism Program at St. Catharine College in Kentucky. PBS has also recently featured Wendell Berry and the program; watch the PBS video here.

Before I ever met him, Wendell Berry had already influenced some of my most deeply held beliefs. This is not particularly novel. People from across the country and further afield say the same of their experience reading this Kentucky farmer and writer’s essays, fiction, and poetry. His aficionados run the gamut: farmers, teachers, writers, women religious, monks, economists, gardeners, shopkeepers, journalists, heiresses, artists, researchers of all stripes, community organizers, doctors, cooks, ascetics, distillers, lawyers, politicians, conservationists, preservationist, wilderness advocates, and even the President of the United States and the Prince of Wales.

Visitors to Berry’s Henry County, Kentucky, farm lay out their personal and philosophical quandaries, seeking his advice on farming practices and on peaceable ways in the presence of fear. Colleges and universities grant him honorary degrees, citing, as Duke University did, their admiration for Berry’s “respect for the land, love of community, and the stewardship of creation,” as well as his “belief that industrialization poses a threat to the natural world.” The U.S. government bestows on him the nation’s highest honors, recognizing his persistence as “a great contrary to the compromises others take in stride” and his defense of “what is being lost to the forces of modernization.” Economists look to him for counsel about how to reunite ecology and economy through oikos, home, or as Berry puts it, “the making of the human household upon the earth: the arts of adapting kindly the many human households to the earth’s many ecosystems and human neighborhoods.”

Read More “A Way of Thought Based on Land”:

Leah Bayens